A short form request for proposal (RFP) is used for proposals which would be considered lower risk. You would not be looking to buy a space shuttle with this template as it is not meant to be for extremely technical spend and lets face it not every proposal needs to be 80 pages long. Here is a preview of a page of a basic RFP we have used in these circumstances.

Free RFP Template

Free RFP Template from RFPTemplates.org – subscribe to download

 

This short form RFP sample includes an invitation, table of contents, background, service/work requirements, submission guidelines and conditions. To get your copy of this edit friendly RFP sample template you can either subscribe and it is included in our free welcome bundle or you can buy our Purchasing Managers bundle and it along with 89 other quality procurement templates will be provided with your order. Download details here >>> purchasing managers bundle.

 

Part Three

In part one and part two of this series we covered the importance of providing a clear, concise and detailed proposal. In part three, we will touch on the remaining components or make-up, the presentation and on responsibilities for your RFP document.

Lets start with some good news — quite often another department like engineering or your technical group is responsible for providing the scope or the technical component of the RFP. They are responsible for putting together the guts of the proposal and the reason why you are issuing the proposal in the first place. You have heard the term “garbage in, garbage out”. Well, if you put garbage in your proposal, it is likely you will receive garbage in response.

As a buyer, you are typically responsible for incorporating this scope or detailed specification into the document. You need to construct or put the proposal together in a manner that makes sense to the bidder. Other areas you need to focus on are the table of contents, the commercial terms, conditions, dates, site visits, meetings and ultimately putting together the evaluation and recommendation from all of the bids received. It is at this point you need to be cognizant of insurance, environmental, regulatory requirements and little things like payment terms.

What are some of the practices you can do to improve presentation and more importantly simplify this task?

  1. Much of a previous RFP Read the rest of this entry

This is an excellent question and one that every Buyer would like the easy answer to. A RFP aka Request for Proposal are becoming more technical by nature and sometimes are even challenged in the legal arena. This issue alone is reason enough to  improve your content to

a) mitigate risks,

b) improve bid responses and

c) to simply provide clarity.

The easier your RFP is to understand the fewer vendor inquiries you will receive, the fewer vendor inquiries you receive the more efficient Read the rest of this entry